metering irrigation use

Forum is open to all questions, answers, and discussions related to water meters, ours or others.
Post Reply
ngant17
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2016 11:23 am

metering irrigation use

Post by ngant17 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 5:58 pm

In your experience, how much permitting is required installing a water meter for irrigation only, as compared to potable meters which are licensed plumbing jobs? I suppose the rules vary from city to city, state to state, ect. For example, I want to meter my shallow well pump, which runs my backyard irrigation. Don't see how that would be a very complex regulatory process where I live(rural, not city). I'm going to check on the county sewer and water dept. for this.

It seems to me that there is a little less regulating involved when you're on working downstream of an irrigation backflow unit. Some counties require a pemit even if you install a single sprinkler in the ground.

Jameson
Posts: 770
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2011 7:42 pm
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Contact:

Re: metering irrigation use

Post by Jameson » Mon Jan 25, 2016 7:35 pm

Yes, I would say it has a lot to do with your local jurisdiction. Im sure there are county or city building departments out there that would technically require a permit for and irrigation water meter (or a single sprinkler head for that matter). But I know there are some customers that install their water meters without letting anyone know as it is for their own use. I would say it comes down to your personal preferences and if you have a good relationship with your neighbors, otherwise I would check with your local agency.

Hope this helps.
Jameson
EKM METERING
http://www.ekmmetering.com
831.425.7371

ngant17
Posts: 9
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2016 11:23 am

Re: metering irrigation use

Post by ngant17 » Tue Jan 26, 2016 5:22 am

That's really good rational advice, I agree 100%.

As an aside, I've done potable-to-reclaimed water conversions for irrigation here locally (Central Fla. area), and one city actually allows the homeowner or individual to do all of that without a permit, as long as cost is $600 or less. That kept the local licensed plumbers from monopolizing the market and/or keeping install costs as high as possible. But it's mainly done as an incentive by the city to encourage reclaim water use, which decreases the load on drinking water resources. You tie into a separate reclaimed water meter installed by the city, disconnect and cap off your potable connection "tee", and trash the backflow valve for scrap metal as it's no longer needed.

Water bills from reclaimed-water irrigation are typically reduced by 33% or more, and more pressure comes out of the lines. A win-win situation.

But for monitoring leaks and breaks in the line, I understand the use-value of submetering an irrigation system and potable water. City meters can't micro-manage water use. That's for the 'smart' customer. Understandably, the city could care less how much water you are getting billed, whether it's a mainline leak or a normal irrigation valve running, the cash flow is what they want to get out of it.

From what I am reading, I think the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Dept. is pioneering the sub-meter business, at least for potable water that DOES NOT enter their sanitary water system. They sell the sub-meters. Or you can bring your own meter, but they have test it. It also has to be replaced every 10 years, and it must be installed downstream within 10 feet of the city water meter, with a separate shut-off. That's so they can verify that it's not metering potable water and then the city can give credit for water that isn't being recycled back into the water treatment plants.

Post Reply